Category Archives: Astrophotography

Naza ScienceCasts: The Super Moon of May 2012 (Tonight, Saturday May 5, 2012)

Reblogggled from : http://talesfromthelou.wordpress.com/2012/05/05/naza-sciencecasts-the-super-moon-of-may-2012-tonight-saturday-may-5-2012/

ScienceCasts: The Super Moon of May 2012 – YouTube.

Related articles

Are you ready for the Super Moon tonight?

 

Tonight’s Full Moon could be hard to miss. Remarkably, its exact full phase (May 6 03:36 UT) will occur less than two minutes after it reaches perigee, the closest point to Earth in the Moon’s orbit, making it the largest Full Moon of 2012. The Full Perigee Moon will appear to be some 14 percent larger and 30 percent brighter than a Full Moon near apogee, the most distant point in the elliptical lunar orbit. In comparison, though, it will appear less than 1 percent larger and almost as bright as April’s Full Moon.  Of course, if you miss May’s Full Perigee Moon, make a note on your calendar. Your next chance to see a Full Moon close to perigee, will be next year on June 23.

What is Perigee?

What is Apogee?

Effect on tides

The combined effect of the Sun and Moon on the Earth’s oceans, the tide, is greatest when the Moon is either new or full. At lunar perigee the tidal force is even stronger, resulting in larger high and low tides on average, but even at its most powerful this force is still weak.

 

Alors, avez vous pigee? or otherwise watch out for the next coming lecture titled Free Lecture 04: Moon Phases and Eclipses

Free Lecture 03: Universe Scale, and Light II

The lecture video is embedded below but also available here in MP4 format.
Additionally, slides used in the lecture are embedded below but also are available here in Powerpoint format.
Questions after the lecture? Please ask them in here.

Wikipedia entries:
Black body
Spectrum
Spectral line
Bohr model
Doppler Effect

Additional Apod photos disccussed

Imagine if we lived in a binary solar system or a triple star or even an open cluster with 10-100 stars or  why not a globular cluster with 100000-1000000 stars….. But don’t we see that we live with one bright star, which is kind a bit unusual, but it rather appears that it is the greatest benefit to humanity, allowing us to have a Night.

The Bohr atom

The Doppler shift high and low

Sheldon Doppler

Global Star Party

28 April 2012


Be sure to reserve Saturday, April 28th, for GAM’s ultimate observing event: the Global Star Party.  Of course, it’s B.Y.O.T. – Bring Your Own Telescope – but encourage even those who don’t have one to come anyway. All are invited, all will be excited.  It is amazing that when we turn our gaze upward all religious, national, cultural and political barriers fade into the darkness.  April 28th is the time to come out under the stars, bridge gaps across the seas, and join your brother and sister skywatchers in proving that the world is, in fact, “One People, One Sky.”

 

Start Early and Follow Up
Not just the 28th, of course, but the whole month of April is dedicated to the science, art, and culture of astronomy, so plan to take your hobby to the streets as often as you can.  Club members need to “divide and conquer” their community on every corner. Get events scheduled and supported by your community’s science centers, planetariums, and science museums.  Spearhead new ways of outreach to convalescent hospitals, rest homes, military bases, busy sections of town, and libraries.  Be ready to accommodate handicapped visitors to your scopes, including those in wheel chairs.  Be on top of your game with lectures, presentations, exhibits, telescope demonstrations, handouts, and star charts—and be ready to dazzle them with fun facts (not boring ones) about the objects you have captured in your eyepiece.


Begin with the Sun
You can build momentum by scheduling events not just in the evening but during the day as well.  Spark interest in our number one star, the Sun, by planning an Astronomy Day at the park with picnic.  And, of course, invite all your daytime guests to your Global Star Party in the evening.  Contact your local observatory—they may be happy to work with you to have a big, all-day astronomy event on their grounds.


Publicize Your Events

But the public won’t know about your Global Star Party unless you get the word out.  Local weekly newspapers are very receptive to running news items about events like this, and if you can give them a well-written story that has a catchy news angle in it, you may get not just a small announcement but a feature article.  Also, if your city or town has a public radio station, they will likely be happy to announce your event—perhaps including an interview with you.


Use Your Creativity
Other than the set date—Saturday, April 28th local time—there is no formal agenda.  Amateur astronomers have proven to be incredibly creative when organizing events, so we encourage you to show us what you can do!  We do, however, encourage everyone to expand the time beyond the regular evening events—starting early with solar activities and continuing until late evening.
Everyone should choose the activities that fit their community and personal preference.  We are encouraging everyone to think in new directions and try new methods of outreach, but want everyone to be comfortable in their choice of events.
Be sure to register you event with AWB online and to come back afterwards and fill out your event reports and post your photos.  We all want to see what our friends around the world are doing!

Some Program Idea

  • Visit a military base, retirement hotel, or children’s hospital and give those able a chance to see the Universe up close.
  • Have a club member dress up as a famous astronomer from history.
  • Find ways to attract attention – your own version of 100HA’s Camel Cart!
  • Use our resources page to get the materials to accommodate the seeing impaired.
  • Host “How Telescopes Work” demonstrations and put your ATM guys to work with mirror grinding demos and use some of that extra glass to let the public try.
  • Hold events outside of art galleries or musical events.
  • Surround a shopping mall or city park with telescopes at every corner or entrance.
  • Hold astropoetry events, such as a public poetry reading at a library.
  • Get a local scout or school group to assist at your star party—have the youngsters ask questions, provide information, and even help run the scope.
  • Have an “artists table” set up so that younger observers can make and take their own souvenirs of the event.
  • Work with a local library to have book displays set up near the telescope so that people can learn more.
  • Work with another club in a different country and set up an internet connection so that those attending your event can connect with others doing the same thing at the same time in a different part of the world.
  • Live-stream your event on Ustream.

 

Share your Star Party experience with us:

Share your Global Star Party images with us via GAM2012 Facebook or Flickr group or Tweet using #GAM2012 hashtag (@gam_awb). Don’t forget to register your events here.

 

Moon and the Parachute Conjunction

There is so much blabbering about Conjunctions nowadays in the astronomy field that I thought my contribution should be there too. During mid-march 2012 you would hear about the Jupiter Venus conjunction, then at the end of the month came the Moon, Jupiter and Venus conjunction. And nowadays  Venus and Pleiades conjunction are making the headlines. (Hope I’ll be posting on these conjunctions) But I am here today with my moon parachute conjunction.

A few days back I went biking after a long pause.  But I didn’t even think that  I would  get this exquisite view of this “conjunction”. After a ride you just want to take a pause, but if you see something remarkable, you just forget the tire-some ride. I had to fumble around quickly for my mobile to take these shots.

 

What seemed peculiar about these parachutes (there were two) were that they were motor driven. I don’t even know what they are called ? Motorized Parachutes?  Or What?

And where was this?

The view was awesome.  This is the view of the Port Chambly Villas & Hotel at Baie du Tombeau. A man made paradise in a natural paradise.

These photos could be considered as the worst in pixels, but personally I liked them. I am not a photographer, neither  an amateur photographer , but I think I do aspire to do some amateur nature photopraghy and  astrophotography later. ( Hope this realizes in the future.)

However, I would always invite any positive criticism to do  better.

Sky Gazers : A Timelapse Tribute

The night sky is perhaps the most enchanting love one can ever find.

The evening twilight gently fades in to darkness. Clouds begin to scatter away and I’m under an ocean of twinkling stars. Another night of pure enjoyment and cosmic adventures. The night sky is perhaps the most enchanting love one can ever find!

This timelapse production is a tribute to all skygazers around the world who enjoy exploring the night sky with their telescopes. I’m happy to release this in April 2012 in celebration of the Global Astronomy Month (gam-awb.org), an international program of Astronomers Without Borders in partnership with world-wide astronomy centers and clubs.

I (Babak A. Tafreshi) made the footage and images between 2007 and 2011 in various locations in Iran, La Palma (Canary Islands), Austria, Germany, and Nepal. Some of the sequences are made during star parties, and observing competitions such as Messier Marathon where a large group of amateur astronomers observe the night sky together.

All rights reserved by Babak Tafreshi (twanight.org/tafreshi) of The World at Night (TWAN) program.

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